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SUCCESSFUL INDIAN OF THE MONTH
Rooma Nanda is currently in the finance industry, working as a residential mortgage consultant. She has over 10 years work experience with various corporates, such as, IBM and Yellow Pages. Rooma has done her MBA from Sydney, and is passionate about learning on a constant basis.  This column is to highlight the achievements of certain individuals who could be a source of inspiration for others. Email 
Indian of the month...Dr Bhuvan Unhelkar (BE, MDBA, MSc, PhD; MACS) has 19 years of professional Information Technology experience in consulting, training and product development. Currently, as a Principal of MethodScience, Bhuvan brings to bear his experience in modeling, process and quality related assignments for his clients. His work is crucial in transforming many of his client organizations to high quality component-based software development and integration. His process and modeling skills have also been applied in large CRM implementation and Data Warehousing projects. Bhuvan exhibits excellent business and technical acumen, and applies both practical as well as research viewpoint, in conducting his numerous successful assignments.

Bhuvan holds Doctorate from University of Technology, Sydney (UTS). His thesis was titled "Effect of Granularity of OO Design in Modelling an Enterprise and its application to Financial Risk Management", and was supervised by Professor Brian Henderson-Sellers. His thesis discussion on IT strategic planning, Methodologies and Processes, Enterprise Modelling and Sociological issues in IT project management have also been successfully tried by him in practical industrial work. Bhuvan is an Honorary Associate of UTS, where he lectures in IT subjects (e-Business, OO) at Master's level and supervises Masters Projects. He has also taught OO Information Systems at University of New South Wales (UNSW) and tutored System Design at University of Western Sydney (UWS).

His work has been published in Object Magazine, ROAD, Computerworld and CACM journals, and as chapters in books including Developing Business Objects (SIGS Publications, 1997), The OPEN Process Specification (Addison-Wesley, 1997) and The Handbook of Object Technology (CRC Press, 1998). He has recently written a book with Prof. Brian Henderson-Sellers titled OPEN modeling with UML, Addison-Wesley, UK, May 2000. He is currently authoring Quality Assurance for UML-based Projects, with Addison-Wesley, due late 2001. Earlier he had written a book with CRC Press titled "After the Y2K Fireworks: Business and Technology Strategies"which concentrated on survival and resurrection strategies using object-oriented techniques for 'Y2K-hit' organizations.

On personal front, Bhuvan has worked in the Indian community in Australia. He has been instrumental in bringing Indian artists on visit to Australia. He has compeered on community radio, and has organized community events.

1)    When did you arrive here in Australia?
July 1986.

2)    How do you compare present scenario in Australia with the time when you first landed here. What are the differences in opportunities, hurdles or people's attitude between then and now? Above all, what was the perception of Indians then?
In 1986, there were very few Indians. Majority arrivals in that era were either computing professional (like myself) or chefs. Before that wave of migration of India, those who came here in 70s, were from medical field. Indians within the major metropolis cities have always been recognized for their hardwork, friendly manners and ability to understand and solve complex IT problems. That image still continues in the new millenum. However, there are many more cross-section of skills that Indians have now brought to Australia. These include accounting, mining, etc.

3)    Do you find Australia as different from any other developed country? If yes, why & how?
The two major differences are that Australia is that less populous and far away from the what the rest of the world would consider as center of the world. It is far away from Europe as well as from USA. This provides advantages in terms of quieter lifestyle, more space for everyone (including on trains, movies and classrooms), relatively slow pace etc. However, things take their own time to reach 'down under', especially in terms of IT field.

4)    You have a specialization in Object Oriented modeling. Was there any specific reason why you chose Object Oriented modeling as your specialisation? What is the future of OO language.
After the IT community produced large relational databases and systems, it was obvious that quality and reuse both were suffering. Higher productivity could be gained by using object-oriented techniques, and so also improved quality. Furthermore, I got the support of Prof. Brian Henderson-Sellers, who agreed to supervise my PhD. Hence Object-orientation, or Component-based modeling and methodology, as the field would now be known.

5)    Being a part time lecturer at UTS, you must have come across quite a few Indian students who are here to make their futures or fulfill their parents' dreams. In your opinion, do you find them serious enough who would go back and implement what they have learnt from here?
There are many sincere and hardworking students who come here, educate themselves, and apply what they have learnt. However, it is vital for them to get their priorities right. Some of them spend a lot of time working in hotels and petrol pumps, and forget the main objective of their arrival. These students sometimes suffer, as they don't get the grades. However, this should not deter students from going out and doing some work, as dignity of labour is high in Australia (as compared to India) and students will learn more than just academics by working part-time. This should not be done at the expense of studies though.

6)    What is the secret behind your success? What aspirations did you have as a child?
Extreme hardwork and deep respect for peers and elders who have done things I would like to do. As a child, my professional aspirations were to run my own company. Personal aspirations, as with every other kid in India, to play cricket test match for India.

7)    Was your career path all planned or was it like one thing lead to another?
Planning, only roughly. My coming to Australia, doing my PhD, and running MethodScience, all were a combination of some planning, some luck and lots of blessings.

8)    What qualities/values of life would you like your students to adhere to?
Humility - ability to put your head down, and work hard is not always easy.
In the Previous Issues:

Anupam Sharma
Vikrant Kapoor - Zaaffran Restaurant
Rashmi Mehrotra
Dr. Jagnnath Mazumdar
Naville Roach - Fujitsu Australia
Dr Arapaut Sivaprasad - WebGenie Systems
Suda Navada
Jeet Bindra - Caltex
Dr. Bhuvan Unhelkar
Safina Uberoi - My Mother India Anupam Sharma Bobby Singh Sheba Nandkeolyar
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